New Yorks Smart IDs Are the Latest Mass Surveillance Nightmare

More than a million New Yorkers could soon willingly agree to carry a government-issued tracking device, whether they realize it or not. Thats the urging caution about the move. The fuss is about a tiny RFID chip that the mayor wants to embed into each and every municipal ID card for New York residents as part of the IDNYC program. The latest proposal might seem modest, but the reality is that it potentially puts hundreds of thousands of us at greater risk of identity theft, stalking, and (for undocumented New Yorkers) deportation. And sadly its part of the global trend towards so-called smart citiesa series of high-tech undertakings that claim to improve municipal efficiency at the modest price of stripping …

Researchers spotlight the lie of anonymous data

Researchers from two universities in Europe have published a method they say is able to correctly re-identify 99.98% of individuals in anonymized data sets with just 15 demographic attributes. Their model suggests complex data sets of personal information cannot be protected against re-identification by current methods of “anonymizing” data — such as releasing samples (subsets) of the information. Indeed, the suggestion is that no “anonymized” and released big data set can be considered safe from re-identification — not without strict access controls. “Our results suggest that even heavily sampled anonymized datasets are unlikely to satisfy the modern standards for anonymization set forth by GDPR [Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation] and seriously challenge the technical and legal adequacy of the de-identification …

As FTC cracks down, data ethics is now a strategic business weapon

Daniel Wu Five billion dollarsWhile many believe the sum is simply a , it’s still the largest amount the Federal Trade Commission has ever levied on a technology company.  51%“delete Facebook”20%While incumbents like Facebook are struggling with their data, startups in highly-regulated, “” industries can take advantage by using a data strategy one would least expect: ethics. Beyond complying with regulations, startups that embrace ethics look out for their customers’ best interests, cultivate long-term trust — and avoid billion dollar fines.  Established, highly-regulated incumbents often use slow and unsystematic data compliance workflows, operated manually by armies of lawyers and technology personnel. Agile data governance systems, in contrast, simplify both these workflows and the use of cutting-edge privacy tools, allowing resource-poor …